WSJ News Central

Pastor, Back in U.S., Welcomed by Trump


President Trump met in the White House with a newly freed evangelical pastor who had been held in Turkey for two years on terrorism charges, bringing to a close a diplomatic standoff with Ankara that had jeopardized relations between the North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies. 197




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Edward Lampert’s Non-Strategy to Save Sears


The hedge-fund veteran spent far less than his rivals on store remodels and expansion, and was reluctant to commit capital to fresh ventures. 79




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Military-Communications Firms Harris, L3 Near Deal to Combine


The deal would unite two big providers of defense communications and electronics with a combined market value of roughly $33.5 billion.




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Is China on the Verge of a Dot-Com Bust?


Tech startups, and their valuations, are booming in China. But where some investors see promise and reward, others see risk and a potential reckoning. How it will play out depends upon whom you ask.




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‘You Just Realize It’s All Gone’: Hurricane Michael’s Heavy Toll


One of the most powerful storms to ever strike the U.S. erased entire neighborhoods and leveled communities. “It looks apocalyptic,” said a resident of Panama City, Fla., whose home was destroyed. 157




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Missing Journalist Was Insider Willing to Cross Saudi Red Lines


Jamal Khashoggi, the missing Saudi journalist now presumed dead, rankled authorities with his socially liberal views and sympathy for the Muslim Brotherhood, but he was also an insider close to some of Saudi Arabia’s most powerful princes. 151




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Why Men Fear Wearing Color. And the Secret to Pulling It Off.


If you’re like most American men, your closet is a sea of dismal neutrals. But this fall’s more hue-happy fashions can uplift your look—as long as you use color judiciously. 71




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The Next Big Swim After the English Channel


Having made it to Alcatraz and France, a San Francisco lawyer hooked on open-water swimming trains for another long-distance plunge.




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How Fathers Should Talk With Their Sons About Sex in the #MeToo Era


A difficult conversation has become even more complex. But dads should persist. Here’s how.




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SoftBank Gives Startups Billions of Reasons to Hold Off IPOs


If SoftBank secures a majority stake in eight-year-old WeWork through its Vision Fund, the move would likely keep the shared office-space company private for years to come, employing what one venture capitalist calls “a holding-company philosophy.”




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Another Postseason Stumble for Clayton Kershaw


The title “Best Pitcher on the Planet” no longer belongs to the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw, who gave up five runs in three innings to the Milwaukee Brewers in Game 1 of the National League Championship Series.




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‘What’s Going to Be on Twitter the Next Day’: Central Banks Close Ranks


The Federal Reserve stressed the need for it to normalize monetary policy gradually and transparently, as its global counterparts warned against threats to central bank independence following President Trump’s criticisms of the Fed.




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Hedge Fund Bets on Beaten-Up New York Taxi Business


Hedge funds that specialize in distressed investing have been kicking the tires of the New York taxi market after prices for medallions plummeted in the face of competition from ride-hailing upstarts.




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Lavazza and Illy Say ‘Basta’ as Global Coffee Wars Come to Italy


Two of the best-known names in Italian coffee are bolstering their businesses, hoping to secure their independence as global coffee giants Starbucks Corp. and Nestlé SA make incursions into their turf.




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Trump Considers Ambassador to Canada as Next U.N. Envoy


President Donald Trump is giving serious consideration to Kelly Craft, the U.S. ambassador to Canada, as the nation’s next ambassador to the United Nations, according to people familiar with his thinking.




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Malaysia’s Anwar a Step Closer to Power


Malaysian politician Anwar Ibrahim took a step closer to succeeding former enemy Mahathir Mohamad as the country’s prime minister when he was elected to Parliament in a special election.




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Power Play: Tiny East Timor Bets Big on Oil and Gas


Sixteen years after East Timor secured its independence, the government in this tiny nation is gambling on a huge new refinery complex to help secure its economic future. If the project falls short, the former colony risks ending up at the mercy of foreign powers again.




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Inside the Tent City Housing More Than 1,000 Migrant Teens


The sprawling tent city near El Paso was supposed to serve as home for a few hundred immigrant children for about a month. But since opening in mid-June, its operations have rapidly expanded. 57




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And Now, Live on Stage, the Clintons!


Bill and Hillary are invading the turf of pop stars and ‘Paw Patrol Live’ 98




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Pope Defrocks Chilean Bishops Accused of Sex Abuse


Pope Francis continued his effort to address abuse scandals that have shaken the traditionally Catholic South American country and the church around the world.




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The Price of Financial Advice Is, Finally, Falling


As the rest of Wall Street cuts all kinds of fees in a race to zero, advisers have been the exception. That is starting to change.




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Contemporary Art Star Brian Donnelly Mixes High and Low


Mr. Donnelly, known as KAWS, has been forging his own path since his days as a teenage graffiti artist.




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Not-the-Nobel Prize in Literature Is Announced


Maryse Condé, a chronicler of the colonial experience, won the New Academy Prize in Literature. The award was created to honor a writer this year after the Swedish Academy postponed the Nobel Prize in literature.




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No Place to Hide for Investors After October Market Rout


Global stocks have lost more than $5 trillion in value in October, along with a rise in bond yields toward their highest levels in years, testing investors’ resolve in a way not seen since the financial crisis.




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Strong Economy Prompts Companies to Raise Prices


From paint to air tickets to handbags, the prices of consumer items are going up as industries pass along higher costs. A long period of low inflation appears to be over.




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Growth Hits 3%; Here’s Why It Is Not Yet Sustainable


The mission of 3% economic growth hasn’t been accomplished, Grep Ip writes, given finite resources, like workers, and the fading effect of the GOP-backed tax-cut.




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IPO Market Rewards Early-Stage Biotechs


Biotech IPOs are on track for a near-record year, with a crop of offerings that are younger, more highly valued—and some say riskier—than any in recent memory.




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‘Hello, [INSERT CITY HERE]’: Trump’s Rally Script Settles Into a Groove


The president has been crossing the country to stump for Republican candidates ahead of Election Day but different cities hear the same tune. 75




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General Motors Operating Profit Jumps 25%


General Motors Co.’s third-quarter operating profit jumped 25%, as the auto maker sold more pricey trucks and sport-utility vehicles in its home U.S. market while sidestepping the trouble in China that has tripped up some rivals.




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Facebook Results Reflect Adjustment to Slower Growth


Facebook recorded lower revenue than expected and said it is in the early stages of a transformation that will lead to slower growth and higher costs in the short term. 55




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Rivals Reap Rewards as China’s Monster Fund Shrinks


Beijing is forcing the world’s largest money-market fund, Ant Financial’s Tianhong Yu’e Bao, to shrink, creating a bonanza for the dozen other money-market funds that Ant has added to its investment platform.




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U.S. Market-Manipulation Cases Reach Record


Federal regulators have ramped up their pursuit of traders who use a bluffing tactic known as spoofing to manipulate market prices, enforcement officials said, leading to a record number of manipulation cases.




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Lion Air Official Ousted as Divers Zero In on Suspected Fuselage


Lion Air was ordered to suspend its technical director and other personnel pending an investigation into the crash of a new Boeing jetliner into the Java Sea that killed 189 people.




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Airbus’s Big Problem: It Can’t Make Jets Fast Enough


European plane maker Airbus said deliveries and free cash flow this year would fall short because of worsening supplier problems, but reported a rise in third-quarter income.




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China’s Factory Weakness Adds to Mounting Worries About Economy


Concerns about the escalating trade dispute with the U.S. are sapping activity in China’s factories, adding to the troubles of an economy already slowing faster than Beijing expected.




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This Is How China Keeps a Firm Grip on the Yuan


The yuan just hit its weakest point against the dollar in a decade. That puts it and the country’s hybrid financial system—where the state and the market both play big roles—back in the spotlight.




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Credit Union’s Employees Saw Anti-Money-Laundering Gaps


Employees at Pentagon Federal told regulators it had a flawed program to prevent money laundering.




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Panic in Stocks? Options Signal No


An unusual dynamic in options markets is signaling that investors aren’t panicking despite October’s stock-market drubbing: Expectations for volatility are greater in individual companies than the broader market.




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U.S. Charges Chinese Agents in Hacking Scheme


Federal prosecutors unsealed charges against 10 Chinese intelligence officers and other individuals Tuesday, accusing them of a persistent campaign to hack into U.S. aviation companies.




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‘My Community Is Falling Behind’


In this installment of our series on the search for common ground in an era of polarization, we spoke to a black man in Baltimore and a white man in rural North Carolina who talk about living in a struggling area.




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The America-Free TPP Is a Done Deal


A trade pact between 11 Pacific Rim nations will come into force this year after Australia became the sixth country to ratify it, nearly two years after President Trump withdrew the U.S. from talks.




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Mexican Border Deployment to Exceed Initial Estimate


The number of U.S. troops being deployed to the Mexican border could grow beyond 5,239—the figure officials announced a day earlier—according to the military commander overseeing the deployment. 54




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NATO Exercise Sends Warning to Russia, Message to Members


A force of NATO warships, aircraft and marines stormed a beach in Norway to practice repelling an invader, part of the bloc’s largest military exercises since the Cold War.




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Carlyle Group Hit by Slower Fund Growth


Profit declined at Carlyle Group in the third quarter as the private-equity firm’s expenses climbed and fund growth slowed.




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Pakistan’s Top Court Frees Christian Woman on Death Row for Blasphemy


A Pakistani Christian mother whose death sentence for blasphemy sparked an international outcry was freed by the country’s highest court.




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Three Candidates Seek to Succeed Merkel at Helm of Party


Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision to step down from her party’s chair this week started a race whose outcome will shape Germany’s political direction.




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Should You Envy People With Soaking Tubs?


Not all designers think so, for reasons both aesthetic and practical, given the athleticism required to simply climb in and out. Here, arguments both pro and con.




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Utz Quality Foods Thrives On Guilty Pleasures


The snack maker’s CEO, Dylan Lissette, says the move to healthy options can be overstated.




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Bags of Cash and a Bomb Plot: Inside a Covert Iranian Operation in Europe


Belgian authorities said they stopped an Iranian émigré and his wife on their way to a conference outside Paris in June, and found a device that contained a powerful explosive. The allegation of a plot on French soil is jeopardizing Europe’s support for the Iran nuclear deal.




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The Morning Ledger: GE's $22 Billion Write-Down Draws Regulatory Attention


GE’s impairment charge is among the biggest in recent history, U.S. companies are raising prices and the EU is investigating a planned steel merger between Tata and Thyssenkrupp.




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Fed Raises Rates, Signals a Tentative Approach Next Year


The Federal Reserve nudged up short-term interest rates for the fourth time this year, defying pressure from President Trump, but suggested it could slow the pace of increases next year in the face of new headwinds. 345




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Stocks Slide After Fed Lifts Rates


The Dow industrials swung nearly 900 points, slumping after the Fed raised rates for the fourth time this year, and ended down more than 350 points. 223




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Pinterest Prepares for Early 2019 IPO


Pinterest is actively preparing for an IPO that could come as soon as April, joining a line of tech companies ramping up plans to go public.




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In Shift, Trump Orders U.S. Troops Out of Syria


President Trump ordered a quick withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria, a contested move that would mark an abrupt reversal of the American military strategy in the Middle East. 1132




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Women in Latin America Are Being Murdered at Record Rates


The deadliest region for men has become perilous for women as well, especially in gang-riddled parts of Central America. 449




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Pfizer, Glaxo Strike Deal to Put Focus on Prescription Drugs


Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline plan to combine their consumer health units and eventually spin off the joint venture, creating the world's largest seller of drugstore staples.




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Marlboro Maker Nears Deal That Values Juul at $38 Billion


Altria Group is nearing a deal to take a 35% stake in e-cigarette startup Juul Labs at a roughly $38 billion valuation, an investment that would make Juul one of the most valuable private companies.




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SoftBank’s Biggest Backers Balk at Planned WeWork Acquisition


Key investors in SoftBank’s giant tech fund have balked at a planned $16 billion investment in co-working startup WeWork, leaving the SoftBank CEO to find an alternative as his ambitions hit up against the limits of his financial firepower.




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U.S. Sanctions Russian Intelligence Agents Over Attacks


The U.S. Treasury Department levied new sanctions against Russia, blacklisting 15 intelligence agents linked to attacks including the attempted assassination of a former spy in the U.K. and election interference.




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Illinois Dioceses Withheld Names of Accused Priests, Report Says


Illinois’s attorney general on Wednesday released a report lambasting Roman Catholic dioceses in the state for allegedly withholding the names of 500 priests accused of sexual abuse.




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Maryland Asks Court to Affirm Obamacare, Nix Whitaker’s Appointment


The rare lawsuit combines two hot-button issues: the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act and President Trump’s selection of Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general. The judge didn’t say when she might rule, and it is possible she could sidestep the appointment issue altogether.




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Inside Elon Musk’s Tunnel to Alleviate ‘Soul-Destroying’ Traffic


Elon Musk took a breather from his electric-car company and rocket maker to showcase his grand vision for a network of tunnels that can shuttle electric cars underground at high speeds. 179




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Stock Exchanges to Test Trading Minus Rebates Seen as Posing Conflict


Securities regulators put in motion the biggest stock-market experiment in more than a decade: a pilot program trading stocks with lower fees and rebates.




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Berkshire Hathaway Reduces Home Capital Investment


Berkshire Hathaway has mostly exited its investment in Home Capital Group, some 18 months after Warren Buffett’s investment vehicle threw the Canadian alternative lender a lifeline.




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Cities Look to Shed Ratings While Taking On More Debt


U.S. cities are using fewer ratings to assess the risks of the bonds they sell, providing investors with just one opinion on an increasing amount of new debt. 56




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Affordable Care Act Sign-Ups Drop Slightly Since Last Year


Analysts attribute the dynamic to a lack of public awareness about open enrollment, repeal of the federal penalty on people who don’t have health insurance and the proliferation of health plans that don’t comply with the Obama-era law.




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House Passes Bill Spurring Quantum Computing


The House voted 348-11 for a bill speeding U.S. development of quantum computing, an emerging technology with potentially revolutionary uses. President Trump is expected to sign the measure.




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Trump Testimony Indicates He Understands Campaign-Finance Laws


President Trump indicated in sworn statements dating back decades he has a deep understanding of campaign-finance law, which experts said could be critical if investigators pursue a case against him over his alleged direction of hush-money payments in the 2016 campaign. 62




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Court Questions Law That Underpins Trump’s Trade Policy


Judges in a special trade court raised constitutional questions over President Trump’s expansive regulation of trade, focusing on a national security law the president has used to impose tariffs on imported goods.




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The Best Music of 2018: New Releases’ New Directions


In the streaming era, as these top-flight recordings prove, musicians are more inventive in creating and packaging their work than ever before.




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Year in Sports: Truth Wins


The Eagles seized a Super Bowl, France took the World Cup, American gymnasts showed bravery—and facts still mattered in 2018.




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Deputy Editor Elisa Lipsky-Karasz’s Gift Guide: All in the Family


From the best kids’ clothing to the perfect desk to make work look gorgeous, this guide has something for everyone




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Tight Job Market Opens Doors for Ex-Convicts


Felons have long been some of the last candidates in the hiring pool. Now, with one of the tightest labor markets in decades, that’s changing. For the past year, The Wall Street Journal documented the journeys of three people released from prison who were trying to enter the workforce. 51




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News Quiz: 2018 in Review


Test your knowledge of some of 2018’s top stories in specific categories. Starting with: Who is this character?




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When It Comes to Evaluating Nonprofits, It Isn’t All About the Overhead


The usual method for judging charities—the efficiency ratio—has some fundamental flaws.




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Voting Threw Rifts Into Stark Relief


Midterms deepened and expanded political divisions in America, between urban and suburban voters on one hand, and rural and small-town residents on the other, with divides by gender, race and education. 72




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As Talks Falter, Trump Says Bypassing Congress Still an Option on Wall


Democrats remained firmly opposed to funding President Trump’s border wall, while Mr. Trump said he was prepared to bypass Congress to build the wall if necessary. 734




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Shutdown Paralyzes IPOs, Imperiling Expectations for 2019


The government shutdown and the halt in the work at the SEC is threatening to spoil what was poised to be a banner year for IPOs.




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Deputy AG Rosenstein Expected to Leave in Coming Weeks


Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is expected to leave the Justice Department in the coming weeks after the confirmation of attorney general nominee William Barr. 251




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December Fed Minutes Show Officials Saw ‘Limited Amount’ of Additional Rate Increases


Federal Reserve officials believed they could be close to ending their recent series of rate increases when they decided last month to raise their benchmark short-term rate.




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Computer Models to Investors: Short Everything


Trend-following investment strategies—a computer-based way of trading that has become a major force in some markets—have gone from bullish to bearish to a degree not seen since the 2007-08 crisis. 78




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Jeff Bezos and His Wife, MacKenzie, Are Divorcing


Amazon Chief Executive Jeff Bezos said in a Twitter message that he and his wife, MacKenzie, are divorcing after 25 years of marriage. 226




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U.S. and China Make Progress on Trade, but Major Hurdles Remain


The U.S. and China wrapped up their first face-to-face trade negotiations since a temporary tariff truce was declared last month, making progress toward an agreement but leaving the thorniest issues to be resolved in higher-level talks.




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As Mideast Allies Fret Over U.S. Support, Pompeo Makes Surprise Stop in Iraq


Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made an unannounced visit to Iraq to meet the country’s top leadership, as he tours the Middle East to reassure allies over concerns that the U.S. is withdrawing from the region.




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U.S. Citizen Charged With Spying in Russia Could See Lengthy Detention


Paul Whelan, the U.S. citizen detained by Russian authorities and charged with espionage, could remain in custody for six months or more as the investigation into his case continues, his lawyer said.




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Beware the 5G Hype: Wireless Rivals Fuel Confusion


U.S. telecom companies have started slapping the 5G label on a smorgasbord of technologies, sowing confusion as they lay the infrastructure for full-fledged mobile 5G wireless service.




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What GE Needs to Do to Avoid Junk Territory


Bond markets are at odds with ratings firms over General Electric’s investment-grade credit rating. Now, the company’s financial future hinges on that grade.




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Tying American Stocks to the Rest of the World


The great decoupling of the American stock markets from the rest of the world was the story last summer. Was last month the start of a great recoupling, where investors should bet on the U.S. falling back in line with global market performance?




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Utilities Speed Up Closure of Coal-Fired Power Plants


The companies are accelerating the closure of coal plants, as wind and solar power become more economical alternatives and natural gas continues to be a cheap fuel for electricity. 248




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Should You Fear the Yield Curve?


There’s a new horror show in the works: “Inversion of the Yield Curve,” in which a chilling, disembodied force seeps into the minds of the public, triggering panic in markets and hand-wringing on cable news.




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Fuel Crisis Hits Mexico After Pipelines Are Closed


Mexico faced a mounting problem on Wednesday as gasoline shortages spread across the country after the government closed several key fuel pipelines to prevent theft by organized crime groups.




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Saudi Arabia Sells More Than $7 Billion in Bonds


Saudi Arabia priced a large international bond deal, drawing support from a roster of Western banks in the kingdom’s first debt sale since the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.




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Jihadists Behind Bars Pose New Risks for Europe


A terrorism trial starting in Brussels on Thursday highlights the difficulties Europe’s courts and prisons face containing the spread of jihadist ideology behind bars. 50




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Kidnapping of Norwegian Multimillionaire’s Spouse Revealed


The wife of a Norwegian multimillionaire real-estate tycoon was abducted more than two months ago, police said on Wednesday, gripping public attention in the rich Nordic country.




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Hong Kong Moves to Criminalize Disrespect of China’s National Anthem


Hong Kong officials will propose a law that would make disrespecting China’s national anthem a crime, raising concern within opposition ranks that it would further narrow freedoms in the semiautonomous Chinese city.




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Why Big Tech Wants Access to Your Medical Records


Tech giants like Amazon and Apple are expanding their businesses to include electronic health records -- which contain data on diagnoses, prescriptions and other medical information. That’s creating both opportunities and spurring privacy concerns. Here’s what to know.




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Standoff Over Stranded Migrants Ends as Europe Opens Doors


A row over the fate of 49 migrants held for weeks on two rescue ships in the Mediterranean Sea ended when Malta reached a deal to allow them to disembark before being transferred to other European nations.




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Who Foots the Bill? Families Fight Over College Debt


As tuition increases outpace household incomes and parents face a battery of other financial pressures, conflict over college debt is intensifying among American families. 89




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Claire Foy Steps Into the Spotlight


Since wrapping her final season of the hit Netflix series ‘The Crown,’ which catapulted her career, British actress Claire Foy has stepped into some of her most defining roles yet.




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Know Enough Not to Act Like a Know-It-All


Ambitious executives often act like they know everything. In hindsight, some professed know-it-alls say they didn’t realize how little they knew about getting ahead.




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Where ETFs Are Headed in 2019


A race to the bottom in fees should continue, and expect to see more funds close up shop.




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U.S. Levels Criminal Charges Against China’s Huawei


The Trump administration unveiled a sweeping set of criminal charges against China’s Huawei Technologies in its latest salvo against the telecom giant. 109




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Big Divides Remain as U.S.-China Trade Talks Resume


Cabinet-level delegations from the U.S. and China will resume trade negotiations Wednesday, but early indications are that the two sides remain sharply divided.




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U.S. Places Sanctions on Venezuela’s Oil Industry


The sanctions hit the country’s main export in a move designed to cripple the Maduro government and empower opposition leader Juan Guaidó. 297




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Wynn Resorts to Settle Nevada Regulator’s Probe


Wynn Resorts executives turned a blind eye as Steve Wynn over more than a decade was accused of sexually assaulting or harassing women, according to allegations contained in a regulator’s report.




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As Global Mining Fatalities Fall, Brazil Deaths Show Problems Remain


The mining industry often displays its ability to shock with deadly accidents such as the burst dam that has left hundreds missing in Brazil, but fatal mishaps in the sector have declined in recent decades.




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Shutdown Worsens Immigration System Woes


The immigration-court backlog grew by at least 10% during the partial government shutdown, as a funding dispute centered on border security left the nation’s immigration system digging out of an even deeper hole. 219




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Nvidia Lowers Guidance on Weakness in China, Cloud Computing


Nvidia lowered its quarterly revenue outlook by $500 million, citing weak demand in China and a rocky cloud-computing business.




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As PG&E Preps for Bankruptcy, Professionals Eye Fee Bonanza


PG&E’s planned bankruptcy to deal with liabilities from California wildfires will be long and costly—and it may bring little relief from legal troubles stemming from its safety record.




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Interim Attorney General Says Mueller Probe ‘Close to Being Completed’


Acting U.S. Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said he has been briefed on special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation and hopes to receive a report as soon as possible. 228




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U.S., Taliban Agree on Key Points in Peace Deal


U.S. and Taliban negotiators have forged a preliminary deal on two vital points to end the war in Afghanistan, the special U.S. envoy said on Monday, as the Afghan president urged the insurgents to negotiate directly with his government.




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Soy Prices Are in a Trough After China’s Sick-Pig Slaughter


More bad news for American farmers: The soymeal-loving pig population of China, the world’s No. 1 soybean importer, is shrinking as herds are culled to try to stop the spread of African swine fever. 83




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Facebook Opens New Fronts to Combat Political Interference


Facebook is planning a dedicated effort to fend off interference in the EU’s parliamentary election campaign this spring, part of a broader strategy at the social-media giant.




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Two Groups Likely Stole $1 Billion in Cryptocurrency Hacks


According to Chainalysis, the two entities, which are likely still active, employed an extensive network of digital wallets to hide their tracks. 94




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Whirlpool Posts Drop in Fourth-Quarter Sales


Results were hurt by weakness in Whirlpool’s Europe, Middle East and Africa region despite higher sales in North America. Shares fell in after-hours trading.




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A $4 Trillion Market Scapegoat: The Fed’s Shrinking Portfolio


Some investors blame the stock market’s volatility on the Federal Reserve shrinking its bond portfolio, but the critique puzzles Fed officials and some economists. 108




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Bank Deal Shows Impact of 2018 Law


The merger of TCF Financial and Chemical Financial, announced Monday, was encouraged by a law signed by President Trump last year that relaxes regulations of midsize banks.




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Trump Administration Renews Permits for Oregon Ranchers


The Trump administration has reinstated grazing leases for an Oregon rancher and his son whose imprisonment on arson charges incited the takeover of a nearby national wildlife refuge three years ago.




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Government Ends Case Against El Chapo, Who Won’t Testify


Prosecutors in Brooklyn closed their nearly 11-week case against Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, who said he would not take the witness stand in his own defense.




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Housekeeper Rescued After Being Trapped in Elevator All Weekend


A 53-year-old housekeeper was rescued from a Manhattan elevator after being stuck inside for three days, New York City officials said.




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U.N. Expert Wants to Examine Saudi Consulate Where Khashoggi Was Killed


A United Nations expert looking into the death of Jamal Khashoggi is seeking authorization from Saudi Arabia to examine the consulate building where the dissident journalist was killed by Saudi operatives last year, challenging the kingdom’s efforts to draw a line under months of global backlash.




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New York Takes Step Toward Allowing Sports Betting


New York’s Gaming Commission took the first step toward legalizing sports betting on Monday, setting the stage for casinos to begin accepting wagers within months.




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How To Make an Iconic Super Bowl Ad


Each year during the Super Bowl, advertising has its one day on the stage. Bryan Buckley, director of 59 Super Bowl ads, explains what makes a 30-second ad iconic.




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Social Media Struggles With Its Awkward Adolescence


Silicon Valley is on a quest to help consumers find a better balance.




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Inside the Rams’ Decision to Hire a 30-Year-Old Coach


Before Sean McVay took Los Angeles to the Super Bowl and changed the NFL, the Rams had to make a leap: Was he ready to become the league’s youngest coach ever?




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The New Branding Strategy: Churn Out ‘Content’


Co-opting the tools of traditional journalism, brands from Red Bull to Ralph Lauren have refashioned themselves into content-creating machines




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Terror Attacks on New Zealand Mosques Kill 49 in One of Nation’s ‘Darkest Days’


A 28-year-old man was charged with murder after shootings at two mosques in the southern city of Christchurch in terrorist attacks the prime minister described as one of the darkest days in the country’s history. Police are investigating if there was more than one attacker involved.




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Trump Says He’ll Veto Congressional Disapproval of Emergency Declaration


President Trump in remarks in the Oval Office said he would veto a congressional resolution disapproving of his national-emergency declaration, the first veto of his presidency.




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SEC Charges Volkswagen With Defrauding U.S. Investors


The SEC charged VW and ex-CEO Martin Winterkorn with defrauding U.S. investors in connection with the emissions scandal.




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Key Ingredient in College-Admissions Scam: A Harvard-Grad Test Whiz


A test-taking whiz who could get any score on demand was a secret weapon in the college-admissions cheating scandal, prosecutors say. 94




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Manufacturing Pullback Flashes Signs of Economic Slowdown


U.S. manufacturing output declined for the second consecutive month in February, a fresh sign that a long-predicted slowdown is hitting the U.S. economy.




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How Sears Lost the American Shopper


Sears once ruled retailing. What were the turning points when it lost its way? An oral history from the people who lived it. 235




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Amazon Tests Pop-Up Feature Touting Its Cheaper Products


Amazon tested a feature on that in some cases pitched its private-label goods on rivals’ pages, highlighting its power on its home turf.




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Pentagon Fails to Provide List of Projects Affected by Emergency


The Pentagon failed to deliver on a promise by acting Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan to provide senators with a list of military construction projects that stand to be affected by President Trump’s emergency declaration, angering lawmakers.




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Trading Frenzy Ahead Thanks to ‘Quadruple Witching’


Friday marks a quarterly collision traders call ”quad witching,” when futures and options expire.




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Auditor That Passed Burst Brazil Dam Warns On Other Inspections


The German auditor of a collapsed Brazilian dam has informed the dam’s owner, Vale SA, that an external review panel has raised questions about its assessment of eight other dams in Brazil, according to a person familiar with the matter.




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U.S. Swipes at International Court Over Afghanistan Investigations


Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the U.S. is imposing visa restrictions against International Criminal Court officials, citing investigations into the activities of Americans and their allies in Afghanistan.




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Red States Seek to Remake Medicaid


Republican-led states are stepping up their efforts with the Trump administration to pursue work requirements and other changes to Medicaid, in the face of legal challenges and Democratic opposition.




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Resilience: How Women Use Obstacles to Fuel Their Success


The Wall Street Journal excerpts its new e-book, Resilience, which chronicles how 20 ambitious women overcame adversity including sexual assault, physical disabilities and doubts about their prospects to become leaders in their fields.




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China Investment in U.S. Startups Keeps Flowing Despite New Rules


Chinese investment in U.S. startups has remained resilient in recent months despite new legislation that some thought could severely hamper deal flow, according to a new report.




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The Hidden Risk When You Own Stocks for the Long Run


Now more than ever, investors need to decide whether they want to lock up their money in bets that could pay off richly–or fail disastrously–down the road.




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The New Rules for Airplane Dressing: Chic, Yet Comfortable


Like it or not, the modern travel uniform has become deeply casual. How to hack it so you’re presentable but still feel good. 64




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These 5 New Ships Are Redefining the ‘Cruise’


For more adventurous, less snoozy sea and river voyages—sailing in the Galápagos, Iceland, even Zanzibar—check out these new and soon-to-launch cruise ships.




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Apple Defends App Store Against Spotify’s Claims


Apple defended its practice of taking a 30% cut of sales through its App Store following criticism from Spotify, escalating a fight between the tech companies as regulators increasingly scrutinize the industry.




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When Does Political Gerrymandering Cross the Line?


The Supreme Court will soon take up the issue of the way states redraw election districts, but a hard answer to partisan gerrymandering may be elusive.




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Can a Traditional Leather Sofa Cozy Up to a Colorful Acrylic Table?


Décor Challenge: A classic Chesterfield sofa must share living space with a screechingly vivid side table. Design pros offer suggestions to bridge the pair’s aesthetic gap.




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Massive Protests Present Big Test for Secretive Algerian Government


Massive protests have spotlighted Algeria’s style of governance, as President Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s circle struggles to navigate the country’s most serious crisis since a devastating civil war in the 1990s.




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The Big Data Behind the NBA’s Next Big Thing


Luka Doncic started traveling halfway across the world to study his biomechanics long before he came to the NBA. Now he’s the league’s star rookie—and the face of the NBA’s data generation.




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Compare Colleges From the WSJ/THE Rankings


Our new tool lets you drill more deeply into schools in the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings. 55




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‘Ash Is Purest White’: Shifting Worlds


Jia Zhang-ke paints a portrait of a quickly changing China in this story about a strong woman and her small-time mobster boyfriend.




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24 Hours of NFL Free Agency: $1.7 Billion in Deals


The NFL off-season officially began this week and through the first day of free agency, players have gotten $1.7 billion in new contracts, according to the NFL Players Association.




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Warner Bros. CEO to Step Down Amid Probe Into Conduct


Kevin Tsujihara will step down as chief executive of AT&T’s Warner Bros. studio following a report that he had an inappropriate relationship with an actress. 68




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Global Payments Giant to Be Created With $35 Billion FIS-Worldpay Deal


FIS agreed to acquire Worldpay for about $35 billion, creating a giant in payments and back-office financial services as more transactions move online.




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U.S. Chip Industry Is Cool on Chinese Purchase Offer


The U.S. semiconductor industry wants no part of any trade deal that calls for stepped-up purchases from China, worried that would give Beijing more control of their production.




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Startups Aim to Overhaul Trading in Treasury Bonds


A handful of startup platforms is trying to reshape the $15 trillion Treasurys market, where most investors still must request price quotes from dealers.




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Boeing Crashes Spur Debate Over Pilot Training


Regulators and pilots are reassessing the bare minimum amount of training crews are required to complete before flying the aircraft maker’s new 737 MAX planes.




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New Zealand Shooting Probe Widens as Leaders Unite for Tighter Gun Laws


The accused Christchurch shooter was a licensed gunowner, an indication of the challenges ahead for New Zealand lawmakers seeking stricter laws as investigations into the mosque attacks expand. 116




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Trump Administration Officials Clash Over Relief for Venezuelan Immigrants


As an embattled Nicolás Maduro clings to power in Venezuela, backed by the country’s military, the Trump administration is deadlocked over a key U.S. option for bolstering the opposition and keeping pressure on the regime, according to U.S. officials and an administration email exchange.​ 64




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ESPN, UFC Reach Exclusive Pay-Per-View Deal


Ultimate Fighting Championship has struck a seven-year agreement with ESPN for the rights to sell and stream its pay-per-view bouts exclusively on its ESPN+ streaming service, starting in April.




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Fed Officials Wrestle With a ‘Dot Plot’ Dilemma


Federal Reserve officials aren’t quite sure what to do about their dots. Most of them see the dot plot of individual projections for interest rates as a valuable tool, but it has increasingly contributed to investor confusion.




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Trump Wants a Strong Yuan—He May Get It Regardless


U.S. negotiators are concerned about another big currency depreciation offsetting any gains from a trade deal. But for the time being, market forces have been pushing the yuan in the other direction.




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Female Economists, in Survey, Cite Gender Discrimination


Female economists say they have been discriminated against and, in some cases, sexually assaulted by their colleagues, according to a new survey by the American Economic Association.




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U.K. Parliament Won’t Revote on Brexit Deal, Speaker Says


The U.K. government’s attempt to force another vote to approve a Brexit deal was blocked by the speaker of the House of Commons, increasing the likelihood the U.K. will have to ask the EU for a long extension of talks.




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O’Rourke Raised $6.1 Million in First 24 Hours of Campaign


Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s first-day fundraising total is the most any candidate has announced so far, surpassing the $5.9 million for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. 356




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Germany Won’t Raise Military Spending, Defying Trump


The German government is poised to renege on its pledge to raise military spending, the latest gesture of defiance by Chancellor Angela Merkel toward President Trump. 302




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Facebook’s Localized Aggregator Has a Problem: Not Enough Local News


Facebook played a role in the decline of local newspapers. Now it has a problem: One-third of Americans live in a place where the social network can’t find enough local news to feed its aggregator.




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French Officials Threaten to Ban Protestors From Champs-Élysées and Other Major Sites


Authorities threatened to ban protesters from the Champs-Élysées and other iconic spots around France after demonstrators last weekend set fires, ransacked stores and clashed with police near the famed avenue.




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Goldman Sachs Implements Its Own ‘Rooney Rule’ in Diversity Push


Managers at Goldman Sachs Group will be required to interview two diverse candidates for any open job, a push the firm hopes will change its heavily white, male workforce.




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Hard-Core Islamic State Members Carry Ideology From Crushed Caliphate


A hardened core committed to Islamic State’s mission raises questions about the totality of the group’s defeat even as it loses almost all its territory and its less committed members fall away. 146




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I Love Duke. Please Forgive Me


Thanks to Zion Williamson, even Duke haters agree the Blue Devils are the most irresistible team in men’s college basketball. 114




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Memo to Both Parties: On Emergency and Impeachment, Beware Unintended Consequences


As Republicans bolster President Trump’s emergency declaration and Democrats flirt with impeachment, now is a good time to remember that in politics, as in life, you should be careful what you wish for, Gerald F. Seib writes. 133




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Over 1,000 Feared Dead After Cyclone Slams Into Mozambique


More than 1,000 people were feared dead in Mozambique four days after a cyclone slammed into the country, submerging entire villages and leaving bodies floating in the floodwaters, the nation’s president said.




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Let the March Madness Machine Create Your Bracket


Choose your priorities and watch the machine create your NCAA tournament bracket.




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New Doubt on Treatment to Prevent Preterm Birth


Seller of synthetic hormone Makena says latest study shows injections made no difference; medical groups say it’s too early to make a call




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Should All College Admissions Become Need-Blind?


Proponents say ending ability to pay as an admissions factor will restore trust in higher ed. Opponents say need-blind admissions is great in theory, but would do real damage.




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U.S. Places Sanctions on Russians Over Conflict in Ukraine


The U.S. imposed sanctions on a number of Russian individuals and firms in response to a November attack off the coast of Crimea and the annexation of the Ukrainian peninsula five years ago.




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